Space Newsfeed

Satellite Communications Technology

GHGSat selects Arianespace to launch GHGSat-C1 on Vega

(15 November 2018 - Arianespace) Arianespace has been selected by GHGSat to launch the GHGSat-C1 satellite on the Vega launch vehicle as part of the Small Spacecraft Mission Service flight in 2019.

Montreal, Canada-based GHGSat is building the GHGSat-C1 spacecraft to measure greenhouse gases emissions from industrial facilities around the world. GHGSat-C1 is a follow-on to the GHGSat-D spacecraft that has been operational in orbit since June 2016.

Toronto-based Space Flight Laboratory (SFL) is providing the satellite platform and managing the launch activities with Arianespace for GHGSat-C1.

The Vega Proof of Concept flight (POC flight) is the first mission of the Small Spacecraft Mission Service (SSMS) a program initiated by the European Space Agency in 2016, with the contribution of the European Commission. For all the European partners involved, its purpose is to perfectly address the burgeoning microsatellite market for both institutional and commercial needs with a new rideshare concept on the Vega light launcher.

Vega is part of the Arianespace launcher family, alongside the Ariane 5 heavy launcher and the Soyuz medium launcher, operated from the Guiana Space Center. Avio based in Colleferro, Italy, is the industrial prime contractor for Vega.

“GHGSat is excited by the opportunity to work with Arianespace and the Vega team,” said Stephane Germain, CEO of GHGSat Inc.

SFL Director Robert Zee added: “The collaboration with Arianespace will provide additional access to space for our customers.”

Following the signature of this contract, which is Arianespace’s first with SFL and GHGSat, Arianespace CEO Stéphane Israël said: “It’s an honor that GHGSat chose Vega to launch GHGSat-C1. We’re absolutely thrilled to be tasked with a mission that will help protect the environment.”

About Arianespace

Arianespace uses space to make life better on Earth by providing launch services for all types of satellites into all orbits. It has orbited more than 580 satellites since 1980, using its family of three launchers, Ariane, Soyuz and Vega, from launch sites in French Guiana (South America) and Baikonur, Kazakhstan. Arianespace is headquartered in Evry, near Paris, and has a technical facility at the Guiana Space Center, Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana, plus local offices in Washington, D.C., Tokyo and Singapore. Arianespace is a subsidiary of ArianeGroup, which holds 74% of its share capital, with the balance held by 17 other shareholders from the European launcher industry.